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Pecan Issues

Danelle Cutting May 27, 2015 Whether you say pee-CAN or pee-CON, pecans are delicious nuts and great for many culinary dishes! They are even highly prized overseas, and that is one reason that the cost of this nut has risen over the years. Because these nuts are in such demand, many people worry about their precious pecan trees. I receive numerous calls and visits during the spring when leaves are coming out, during pollination, or in the winter when nuts have dropped. When people visit, they want to know what is wrong with their pecan, or why their yield is not good. When I ask them the variety of pecan they have, they are clueless since it has been there for many years. Pecans can live for a long time, and most varieties really start to yield around 25 years of age. Some homeowners plant pecan trees and if they only have one or just one type, pollination is inadequate and probably the main reason for not getting any nuts. The serious questions come when homeowners have had good yields in the past and want to know why that has changed. The first question I ask is if they have soil sampled their pecan. This is most very important. If you sample between April and November, there is no charge! Pecans need fertilizer and zinc, but you need a soil sample to know exactly how much of each. Drought, humidity, disease (specifically scab), and frosts can cause issues with pecans. In North Carolina, we are really on the edge of the pecan growing area; they actually do best in the coastal regions. Some varieties tend to be alternate bearers and will only have a decent crop every other year. But, if you get a disease, drought, insect problem, or frost, you may lose your crop. Weather plays a huge role in the growing of pecan trees! There have been times when things were great but during pollination, there was too much rain, and the trees were not properly pollinated. Frosts can kill, pack, or stress the trees, while drought can cause the pecans to prematurely drop. Insects and disease can be problematic as well. Pecan weevils are the most serious pests for these trees. They attack the fruit, causing the nut to drop prematurely. Then, their larvae will feed within the nut. Scab is one of the major diseases and is quickly recognized by the dark spots on the leaves and shuck (outside covering of the nut). Selecting resistant varieties help reduce scab. An oddity is Phylloxera, where insects cause raised galls on pecan leaves. So, what is a homeowner to do? Unfortunately, there is not a whole lot that can be done when it comes to disease and insect problems because you have to have specialized equipment to reach high into the canopy. To help reduce issues, it is best to select proper varieties for your area and to soil sample! For more information on growing your own pecan, call your local Cooperative Extension Agent, Danelle Cutting, at 704-216-8970, or visit: http://content.ces.ncsu.edu/growing-pecans-in-north-carolina/.

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Pecan Issues

Danelle Cutting May 27, 2015 Whether you say pee-CAN or pee-CON, pecans are delicious nuts and great for many culinary dishes! They are even highly prized overseas, and that is one reason that the cost of this nut has risen over the years. Because these nuts are in such demand, many people worry about their precious pecan trees. I receive numerous calls and visits during the spring when leaves are coming out, during pollination, or in the winter when nuts have dropped. When people visit, they want to know what is wrong with their pecan, or why their yield is not good. When I ask them the variety of pecan they have, they are clueless since it has been there for many years. Pecans can live for a long time, and most varieties really start to yield around 25 years of age. Some homeowners plant pecan trees and if they only have one or just one type, pollination is inadequate and probably the main reason for not getting any nuts. The serious questions come when homeowners have had good yields in the past and want to know why that has changed. The first question I ask is if they have soil sampled their pecan. This is most very important. If you sample between April and November, there is no charge! Pecans need fertilizer and zinc, but you need a soil sample to know exactly how much of each. Drought, humidity, disease (specifically scab), and frosts can cause issues with pecans. In North Carolina, we are really on the edge of the pecan growing area; they actually do best in the coastal regions. Some varieties tend to be alternate bearers and will only have a decent crop every other year. But, if you get a disease, drought, insect problem, or frost, you may lose your crop. Weather plays a huge role in the growing of pecan trees! There have been times when things were great but during pollination, there was too much rain, and the trees were not properly pollinated. Frosts can kill, pack, or stress the trees, while drought can cause the pecans to prematurely drop. Insects and disease can be problematic as well. Pecan weevils are the most serious pests for these trees. They attack the fruit, causing the nut to drop prematurely. Then, their larvae will feed within the nut. Scab is one of the major diseases and is quickly recognized by the dark spots on the leaves and shuck (outside covering of the nut). Selecting resistant varieties help reduce scab. An oddity is Phylloxera, where insects cause raised galls on pecan leaves. So, what is a homeowner to do? Unfortunately, there is not a whole lot that can be done when it comes to disease and insect problems because you have to have specialized equipment to reach high into the canopy. To help reduce issues, it is best to select proper varieties for your area and to soil sample! For more information on growing your own pecan, call your local Cooperative Extension Agent, Danelle Cutting, at 704-216-8970, or visit: http://content.ces.ncsu.edu/growing-pecans-in-north-carolina/.

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Growing Shiitake

May 5, 2015 By working with local farmers, I get exposed to many new ideas, growing techniques, and unique crops that have not been previously grown in our area. One such crop is mushrooms, mainly being the Shiitake Mushroom. We have had a few classes on growing Shiitake, and it is definitely not for the faint of heart. For the home gardener, it is nice to have a few mushrooms here and there but for those that have hundreds or thousands of logs, not having a consistent supply can be a problem. NC A&T State University helps host mushroom growing workshops in early spring and offers free mushroom spawn to growers that are willing to commit to at least 200 logs. The mushrooms are best grown in white or red oak logs, cut within two weeks of use, no longer than four feet in length, and no more than eight inches in diameter. Growers drill holes into the logs and pack them with “sawdust spawn.” Then, they seal the holes, cuts, and cut ends with cheese or beeswax. The reason they use fresh logs and wax is to prevent other fungi from inoculating the logs so that the grower can be sure of the mushrooms that will be sprouting. The logs are usually staked under pine trees or shade. Newly inoculated logs can take six months to a year before they start “fruiting.” Logs can last up to 10 years, but the type of wood used contributes to getting the most life out of them. Fruiting logs are sporadic and depending on the type of spawn, they fruit in the spring or fall, usually after a rain. Some growers try to force the logs to fruit by soaking them in a water bath. Forcing the inoculated logs can help, but it is not 100% effective, which makes predicting when a grower will have fresh mushrooms almost impossible. For many of the first growers, it was feast or famine; they would have 50 lbs. of mushrooms one week and then none the next. Most growers are also dehydrating the precious mushrooms so that they do not lose a crop. Producing Shiitake sounds easy until you try and market a product that you cannot guarantee when you will have it or how much you will have. So, be sure to appreciate the growers that bring them to market. Shiitake mushrooms are great and delicious! I love mine sautéed in olive oil, salt, and fresh garlic, simple but amazing! If you would like more information on buying local, growing your own Shiitake mushrooms, or on the topics mentioned in this article, please call your local Cooperative Extension Agent, Danelle Cutting, at 704-216-8970.

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NC Cooperative Extension Service

Crop and Animal
Science

Most ethnic holidays change from year to year (even Christian Easter) with the exception of Christmas. This article describes what various ethnic groups like to buy for their holiday festivities; at the end, I have included a table with the various holidays from 2014 until 2018. Ethnic Holidays 2014-2018 -       Foot scald typically happens in grazing animals and is typically associated with spring dew and wet conditions. Foot Scald -       Coccidia will affect kids when stressed, and weaning is a stressful period. ANS 09-616MG Coccidiosis -     Do  not to wait until 6, 10, or more animals die to call extension for help or to bring a dead animal in for necropsy. I still occasionally receive such calls, which really is a pity. ANS 06-613MG Herd Animal Death Problems/ANS 09 614MG Enterotoxemia

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Rowan County
Staff

Rowan County Center gives our county's residents easy access to the resources and expertise of NC State University and NC A&T State University.

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Pecan Issues

Danelle Cutting May 27, 2015 Whether you say pee-CAN or pee-CON, pecans are delicious nuts and great for many culinary dishes! They are even highly prized overseas, and that is one reason that the cost of this nut has risen over the years. Because these nuts are in such demand, many people worry about their precious pecan trees. I receive numerous calls and visits during the spring when leaves are coming out, during pollination, or in the winter when nuts have dropped. When people visit, they want to know what is wrong with their pecan, or why their yield is not good. When I ask them the variety of pecan they have, they are clueless since it has been there for many years. Pecans can live for a long time, and most varieties really start to yield around 25 years of age. Some homeowners plant pecan trees and if they only have one or just one type, pollination is inadequate and probably the main reason for not getting any nuts. The serious questions come when homeowners have had good yields in the past and want to know why that has changed. The first question I ask is if they have soil sampled their pecan. This is most very important. If you sample between April and November, there is no charge! Pecans need fertilizer and zinc, but you need a soil sample to know exactly how much of each. Drought, humidity, disease (specifically scab), and frosts can cause issues with pecans. In North Carolina, we are really on the edge of the pecan growing area; they actually do best in the coastal regions. Some varieties tend to be alternate bearers and will only have a decent crop every other year. But, if you get a disease, drought, insect problem, or frost, you may lose your crop. Weather plays a huge role in the growing of pecan trees! There have been times when things were great but during pollination, there was too much rain, and the trees were not properly pollinated. Frosts can kill, pack, or stress the trees, while drought can cause the pecans to prematurely drop. Insects and disease can be problematic as well. Pecan weevils are the most serious pests for these trees. They attack the fruit, causing the nut to drop prematurely. Then, their larvae will feed within the nut. Scab is one of the major diseases and is quickly recognized by the dark spots on the leaves and shuck (outside covering of the nut). Selecting resistant varieties help reduce scab. An oddity is Phylloxera, where insects cause raised galls on pecan leaves. So, what is a homeowner to do? Unfortunately, there is not a whole lot that can be done when it comes to disease and insect problems because you have to have specialized equipment to reach high into the canopy. To help reduce issues, it is best to select proper varieties for your area and to soil sample! For more information on growing your own pecan, call your local Cooperative Extension Agent, Danelle Cutting, at 704-216-8970, or visit: http://content.ces.ncsu.edu/growing-pecans-in-north-carolina/.

READ THE REST »
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EVENTS View All
PLT K-8 WorkshopWed Aug 12, 2015
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM Where:
850 Warren Coleman Blvd, Concord, NC 28025, USA
— 1 week away
NCACC Youth SummitFri Aug 21 - Sat Aug 22, 2015 - ALL DAY— 3 weeks away
Holiday - Office ClosedMon Sep 7 - Mon Sep 7, 2015 - ALL DAY— 1 month away
4-H PALS/County Council MeetingThu Sep 10, 2015
6:00 PM - 7:30 PM— 1 month away
4-H Forestry ContestSat Sep 19 - Sat Sep 19, 2015 - ALL DAY— 2 months away
Rowan County FairFri Sep 25 - Sat Oct 3, 2015 - ALL DAY— 2 months away
National 4-H Science ExperimentTue Oct 6, 2015
6:30 PM - 8:00 PM— 2 months away
4-H County Council MeetingThu Oct 8 - Thu Oct 8, 2015 - ALL DAY— 2 months away
More Events